grimthorpe

Pronounced: GRIM-thorp, verb

Notes: I don’t recall running across this word, but “grim” makes it look vaguely bad


Yesterday’s word

The word poetaster is “a bad poet; a writer of poor or mediocre verse”

First usage

Our word came into English in the late 1500s

Background / Comments

As I noted yesterday, I think I’ve posted this word before… but I had vocabulary words at work for several years and I posted words on Facebook for a year before I moved it here. I was surprised at the age of this word; I thought it was more recent. In addition, I thought that this word was just poet run together with disaster, but that’s not right. The poet part is correct (and comes from Latin), but the -aster is also Latin and is a pejorative suffix meaning “something that imperfectly resembles or mimics the real thing”.

Published by Richard

Christian, lover-of-knowledge, Texan, and other things.

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