crinose

Pronounced: CRY-nohs (alt: KRIN-ohs), adj Notes: A great word to know Yesterday’s word The word marmorean means “resembling marble or a marble statue, for example, in smoothness, whiteness, hardness, coldness, or aloofness” First usage Our word came into English in the mid-1600s Background / Comments Our word comes from the Latin word marmor (marble)

marmorean

Pronounced: mahr-MORE-ee-uhn, adj Notes: Also spelled marmoreal; I think I’ve seen this word somewhere, but I didn’t know the definition Yesterday’s word The word favonian means First usage Our word came into English in the mid-1600s Background / Comments Our word came from the Latin word Favōniānus (Favonius, the Roman personification of the west wind).

panegyric

Pronounced: pan-ih-JIR-ick (alt: pan-ih-JAYE-rick), noun Notes: I’ve run across this word, but couldn’t define it well Yesterday’s word The word chunter means “to mutter, grumble, or chatter” First usage Our word came into English in the late 1500s Background / Comments Our word is considered an imitative word – saying “chunter” several times run togetherContinue reading “panegyric”

nonesuch

Pronounced: NUN-such, noun Notes: I thought this word was an adjective, not a noun Yesterday’s word The word gnar means “to snarl or growl” First usage Our word came into English in the late 1400s. Background / Comments It is thought to be of imitative origin (that gnar sounds like a snarl or growl).