hadal

Pronounced: HAYD-l, adj

Notes: Another new word for me


Yesterday’s word

The word judder, as a verb, means “to shake or vibrate violently”. As a noun it means “an intense shaking or vibration”

First usage

This word came into English in the 1920s.

Background / Comments

You may have correctly guessed that this is another blended word — this time it is jerk/jolt/jar combined with shudder. Nevertheless, I don’t recall reading or hearing this word.

judder

Pronounced: JUD-uhr, verb/noun

Notes: I didn’t know this was a word, but you may be able to guess the meaning


Yesterday’s word

The word trachle means “an exhausting effort such as from a long walk or lengthy work”

First usage

This word came into English in the mid-1500s

Background / Comments

Our word comes from the Dutch word tragelen (to walk laboriously). I haven’t seen a lot of words in the lists that have a Dutch origin.

trachle

Pronounced: TRAH-khuhl, noun

Notes: I don’t think I’ve run across this word


Yesterday’s word

The word solunar means “relating to the sun and the moon” (as you might think)

First usage

This word came into usage in the 1930s

Background / Comments

This word is the words “solar” and “lunar” run together to make the new word.

solunar

Pronounced: so-LOO-nuhr, adj

Notes: It’s probably what you think (but I’ve never seen this word before)


Yesterday’s word

The word miscegenation is “a marriage between different racial groups” (but see comments)

First usage

This word came into English in the mid-1800s

Background / Comments

A note on the definition: I’ve run across differences in the definitions; some use the one I provided above, but some add “cohabitation” and “collaboration” in addition to “marriage”, and add “cultural groups” to “racial groups”. During the US Civil War, a journalist named David Goodman Croly wrote an anonymous pamphlet that attempted to discredit the Lincoln administration and the abolitionist movement. He coined the term miscegenation to refer to marriage between blacks and whites. The word was based on the Latin words misc─ôre (to mix) combined with genus (species, race, stock). Over time, the definition has widened from this rather narrow definition. I noted that I’ve run across this word during reading; it referred to a mixed marriage between different races (not the narrow original meaning).

miscegenation

Pronounced: mih-sej-uh-NAY-shun (alt: miss-ih-juh-NAY-shun), noun

Notes: I’ve run across this word in some reading, but I wasn’t sure of it


Yesterday’s word

The word glocalize means “to make a product or service available widely, but adapted for local markets”

First usage

As one might expect, this is a relatively recent word – it came into English in the 1980s

Background / Comments

This word is really just global and localize run together.

glocalize

Pronounced: GLOW-kuh-lize, verb

Notes: You may be able to guess the meaning, but I’ve not run across this word, so it is here


Yesterday’s word

The word sward is “a grassy patch of land; an area of turf”

First usage

This is a very old word; going back to before 900.

Background / Comments

I am pretty sure I’ve run across this word in my reading, but as I noted yesterday, I usually get the meaning wrong (unless it is obvious from the syntax). It is a Middle English word that came from the Old English word sweard (skin; rind). This Old English word is thought to be related to the German word Schwarte (rind), the Old Frisian word swarde (scalp), and/or the Middle Dutch word swaerde (skin).

sward

Pronounced: swawrd, noun

Notes: I get this word wrong because it looks to me like a combination of “sword” and “swath” and it’s not related to either.


Yesterday’s word

The word prodnose means, as a verb, “to pry”. As a noun, it refers to “a prying person”.

First usage

This word came into English in the 1950s

Background / Comments

This word came from a character named “Prodnose” that appeared in columns of J B Morton writing under the pen name “Beachcomber”. These articles appeared in the Daily Express, a tabloid newspaper in the UK. Perhaps the word is more common in the UK than in the US. As I said, I don’t think I’ve ever run across this word.

prodnose

Pronounced: PROD-nose, verb/noun

Notes: Another word I don’t think I’ve every run across


Yesterday’s word

The word xanthic means “yellowish in color”

First usage

This word goes back to the early 1800s

Background / Comments

Our word comes from the French word xanthique. The root word is xantho- (yellow).

xanthic

Pronounced: ZAN-thick, adj

Notes: Another word that is a stranger to me


Yesterday’s word

The word satrap is

  • a governor of a province in ancient Persia
  • a subordinate ruler or official
First usage

The word came into English in the late 1300s

Background / Comments

This is quite a traveled word: It came from the Latin word satrapes, which came from Greek. It came to Greek from the old Persian word khshathrapavan (protector of the province), which is a combination of khshathra- (province) and pava (protector).

satrap

Pronounced: SAY-trap (alt: SAT-rap), noun

Notes: It looks like a trap for a system administrator (an SA, as we call them), but I’m pretty sure that’s not right


Yesterday’s word

The word mishpocha is “the entire family network; the full extended family”

First usage

This word came into English in the mid-1800s

Background / Comments

I wrote yesterday that I thought it looked Indian; I was wrong. Our word has Yiddish origins, coming from the word mishpokhe. This is (not surprisingly) taken from the Hebrew word mishpahah (family; clan).